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Your Worrying Questions On Elective And Emergency C Sections In Pregnancy

When is an elective c section necessary in women?
An elective Caesarean section is performed one to two weeks before the baby's due date. This ensures the baby is mature before delivery.When is a Caesarean necessary?
In some situations a Caesarean may be the only safe option for mother and baby.

If the placenta lies so low in the uterus it covers the birth canal (cervix). This is called placenta praevia.
the obstetrician finds baby's health is threatened due to lack of oxygen.
Vaginal bleeding and a natural delivery is not about to happen.
umbilical cord falls forwards and the baby cannot be delivered easily (a condition known as cord prolapse).
it becomes clear during labour that the mother will be unable to deliver the baby herself.
In other situations a Caesarean may be considered the safest option even though a vaginal birth is a possibility:

if the baby is lying with its head upwards or across tummy (breech baby).
if the mum to be is affected by high blood pressure or other illness. Baby is too small or too weak to survive a natural birth.
Mum has had a Caesarean birth before and is is need of another.
If you wish to have a Caesarean section without a medical reason, you should discuss this with your obstetrician. You don't have an automatic right to demand a Caesarean if it's considered not to be in your best interests medically.
More reasons for the need to have a c section operation include...
labor isn't progressing.
The cervix isn't opening enough despite strong contractions over several hours.
Or the baby's head may simply be too big to pass through your birth canal.
Your baby's heartbeat has started to dip too fregquently. suggests reduced oxygen supply. If your baby isn't getting enough oxygen or your doctor is concerned about changes in your baby's heartbeat, he or she may recommend a prompt C-section.
Baby is in an abnormal position. A baby whose feet or buttocks enter the birth canal before the head is in the breech position. If your doctor isn't able to move the baby into a more favorable position before labour starts, you may need a C-section to reduce the risk of complications.
A C-section is also needed if your baby is lying horizontally across your uterus.
Your baby's head is in the wrong position. If your baby enters the birth canal chin up or with the top of the forehead or face leading the way, he or she may not fit through your pelvis. A C-section may be the safer way to deliver the baby.
You're carrying twins, triplets or other multiples. When you're carrying multiple babies, it's common for one or more of the babies to be in an abnormal position. In this case, Caesarean birth is often safer "" especially for the second baby.
There's a problem with your placenta. If the placenta detaches from your uterus before labor begins (placental abruption) or the placenta covers the opening of your cervix (placenta previa), C-section is often the safer option.
There's a problem with the umbilical cord. A C-section may be recommended if a loop of umbilical cord slips through your cervix ahead of your baby or if the cord is compressed by the uterus during contractions.
Your baby is very large. Some babies are simply too big to safely deliver vaginally. Typically this is only a factor if you have diabetes.
Underlying health problem. If you have a condition such as diabetes, heart disease or lung disease, your doctor may induce labor early to reduce the risk of pregnancy-related complications. If the induction isn't successful, you may need a C-section.

A C-section may be recommended if you have an active genital herpes infection or another condition that your baby might acquire while passing through the birth canal.

Your baby has a health problem. A C-section may be safer for babies with certain developmental problems, such as failure of the spine to close properly (spina bifida) or excess fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus).
You've had a previous C-section. Depending on the type of incision and other factors, you may be able to attempt a vaginal delivery after a previous C-section. In some cases, however, your doctor may recommend a repeat C-section.
In addition, some women request elective C-sections with their first babies "" typically to avoid labor or the possible complications of vaginal birth. If you're considering an elective C-section, work with your doctor to make the best decision for you and your baby.

What happens during a Caesarean?
At a Caesarean section there will be the surgeon (obstetrician) and his or her assistant, the anaesthetist and assistant, the scrub-nurse, two other nurses or midwives and a paediatrician.

Your partner or husband or close friend can be present if the operation is being carried out under a spinal or epidural anaesthetic.

An incision of about 20cm is made across the lower abdomen. The baby is delivered through the skin after the womb is opened. The womb is easily opened and it takes only a few minutes for the baby to be born.

After the placenta (afterbirth) is delivered, the obstetrician closes the incision. Dissolving stitches or staples are used to close the skin. From beginning to end, an uncomplicated Caesarean will take between 20 and 30 minutes.

Will I feel pain during the Caesarean?
Most anaesthetists will perform a spinal or epidural anaesthetic via a fine needle placed midway down the spine.

You will experience some feeling of pressure,pulling and tuging as surgeon gets baby out during the Caesarean, but will not feel pain.

A general anaesthetic may be advised under certain circumstances. This is when you are rendered temporarily unconscious.

What are the risks?
A Caesarean section is a safe operation for you and your baby. However, as with any major surgery, there are risks involved.

The main risks are for the mother, such as heavy bleeding at the time of surgery and after delivery, infection in the wound or the development of a blood clot (thrombosis) in the leg veins.

Risks for the Mother A few women have one or more of these complications after a c-section: Increased bleeding, which may require a blood transfusion Infection in the incision, in the uterus, or in other nearby organs Reactions to medications, including the drugs used for anesthesia Injuries to the bladder or bowel Blood clots in the legs, pelvic organs or lungs

Your doctor and midwife will ensure that the appropriate measures are taken to reduce your risk of developing of complications.

What about after the Caesarean operation?
Most women are up and about within 24 hours of a Caesarean. Pain from the wound is controlled with appropriate painkillers. Most mothers leave hospital four or five days after a Caesarean birth.

A Caesarean section should not prevent a mother from breastfeeding her baby.

Future pregnancies may also need to be delivered by Caesarean section because some indications for the original Caesarean persist into subsequent pregnancies.

However, the majority of women will be able to have a vaginal birth next time.

A.4More reasons for the need to have a c section:

Your labor isn't progressing.
Stalled labor is the most common reason for a C-section. Perhaps your cervix isn't opening enough despite strong contractions over several hours. Or the baby's head may simply be too big to pass through your birth canal.
Your baby's heartbeat suggests reduced oxygen supply. If your baby isn't getting enough oxygen or your doctor is concerned about changes in your baby's heartbeat, he or she may recommend a prompt C-section.
Your baby is in an abnormal position. A baby whose feet or buttocks enter the birth canal before the head is in the breech position. If your doctor isn't able to move the baby into a more favorable position before labor begins, you may need a C-section to reduce the risk of complications.
A C-section is also needed if your baby is lying horizontally across your uterus.
Your baby's head is in the wrong position. If your baby enters the birth canal chin up or with the top of the forehead or face leading the way, he or she may not fit through your pelvis. A C-section may be the safer way to deliver the baby.
High risk multiples.You're carrying twins, triplets or other multiples. When you're carrying multiple babies, it's common for one or more of the babies to be in an abnormal position. In this case, Caesarean birth is often safer "" especially for the second baby.
There's a problem with your placenta. If the placenta detaches from your uterus before labor begins (placental abruption) or the placenta covers the opening of your cervix (placenta previa), C-section is often the safer option.
There's a problem with the umbilical cord. A C-section may be recommended if a loop of umbilical cord slips through your cervix ahead of your baby or if the cord is compressed by the uterus during contractions.
Your baby is very large. Some babies are simply too big to safely deliver vaginally. Typically this is only a factor if you have diabetes.
You have a health problem. If you have a condition such as diabetes, heart disease or lung disease, your doctor may induce labor early to reduce the risk of pregnancy-related complications. If the induction isn't successful, you may need a C-section.
In other circumstances, a C-section may be recommended if you have an active genital herpes infection or another condition that your baby might acquire while passing through the birth canal.
Your baby has a health problem. A C-section may be safer for babies with certain developmental problems, such as failure of the spine to close properly (spina bifida) or excess fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus).
You've had a previous C-section. Depending on the type of incision and other factors, you may be able to attempt a vaginal delivery after a previous C-section. In some cases, however, your doctor may recommend a repeat C-section.

Q.5 What happens during a Caesarean?
A.5 At a Caesarean section there will be the surgeon (obstetrician) and his or her assistant, the anaesthetist and assistant, the scrub-nurse, two other nurses or midwives and a paediatrician.

Your partner can be present if the operation is being carried out under a spinal or epidural anaesthetic.

An incision of about 20cm is made across the lower abdomen. The baby is delivered through the skin after the womb is opened. The womb is easily opened and it takes only a few minutes for the baby to be born.

After the placenta (afterbirth) is delivered, the obstetrician closes the incision. Dissolving stitches or staples are used to close the skin. From beginning to end, an uncomplicated Caesarean will take between 20 and 30 minutes.

Q6.What will I feel during the Caesarean?
A.6 Most anaesthetists will perform a spinal or epidural anaesthetic via a fine needle placed midway down the spine.

You will experience some feeling of pressure pulling or tugging as baby is eased out during the Caesarean, but will not feel pain.

A general anaesthetic may be advised under certain circumstances. This is when you are rendered temporarily unconscious,you are put alseep during the operation.

Q7.What are the risks of a caesarean section ?
A.7 A Caesarean section is a safe operation for you and your baby. However, as with any major surgery, there are risks involved.

The main risks are for the mother, such as heavy bleeding at the time of surgery and after delivery, infection in the wound or the development of a blood clot (thrombosis) in the leg veins.

Your obstetrician and midwife will ensure that the appropriate measures are taken to reduce your risk of developing of complications.

Q8.What about getting around after the Caesarean?
A.8 Most women are up and about within 24 hours of a Caesarean. Pain from the wound is controlled with appropriate painkillers. Most mothers leave hospital four or five days after a Caesarean birth.

A Caesarean section should not prevent a mother from breastfeeding her baby.

Future pregnancies may also need to be delivered by Caesarean section because some indications for the original Caesarean persist into subsequent pregnancies.

However, the majority of women will be able to have a vaginal birth next time.

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About the Author:
Qualified Baby and Early Years specialist.T.D.L.B D32+D33 Assessor.Owner of Cheeky Chums Cheeky Chums the Premature Baby Store, plus more For choices galore visit the cheeky chums store at http://cheekychumsonline.co.uk

Source: http://www.articlesnatch.com/Article/Your-Worrying-Questions-On-Elective-And-Emergency-C-Sections-In-Pregnancy/1064359


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