Bad C Section Scars

The VBAC climate in this country is bad right now and we need to fight ...

Scars in Your Hands: What Do They Mean?

Copyright (c) 2008 Elizabeth Davis

A scar is where trauma once stood but stands no more.

A scar is memory. (Why does scar tissue replace itself? If our cells constantly replenish, why does a scar remain? Memory of the injury? DNA? Both?)

A scar says you've engaged with life and survived the confrontation.

A scar makes you stronger.

Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia, says, "A scar results from the biologic process of wound repair in the skin and other tissues of the body. Thus, scarring is a natural part of the healing process. With the exception of very minor lesions, every wound (e.g. after accident, disease, or surgery) results in some degree of scarring." A scar is a healing. Ponder that for a moment.

Where do you have scars? The location is our first clue to its potential meaning. Since I'm a hand analyst by trade, we'll focus today on scars in your hands.

Here's a list of scar locations in your hands and their possible meanings. Please re-interpret the meaning for yourself by reflecting on how old you were when the injury occurred, how you felt about your life at that time and what issues you were struggling with then, if any. Please note these "scars" can be cuts, scrapes, sprains, discoloration, warts, calluses, etc.

Scar Locations In Your Hands:

* Back of the hand: Self-protection, self-defense, confrontation, avoidance, anger

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Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/self-improvement-articles/scars-in-your-hands-what-do-they-mean-413869.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Do c-sections leave bad scars?
    I just want to know how bad a c-section scar would be and if it will ever fade to a point where its almost not visible

    • ANSWER:
      A lot depends on your skin pigmentation and just how your own body reacts to scarring but generally in the beginning it will be very red and raised and over time it will flatten out and lighten to a sort of light silvery color. Two years after my first I had bumpyness and redness but during my second I think my doctor actually cleaned it up a bit and it looks smoother and just a little pinkish. Either way, virtually all c-section scars these days are very low, like right at or just below the hairline, so the only ones who would see it are people who see you totally naked. Even your bikini or underwear would cover the scar.

  2. QUESTION:
    Did your c section scar smell bad?
    I had a c section 2 months ago and my scar is still a little smelly. I know a bad smell on a fresh wound can indicate infection but my cut is all healed up. Someone else I talked to who had a c section 2 months ago said hers smells bad too. Did anyone else experience this? Its rather annoying.

    • ANSWER:
      yes. It is soooooo annoying.

      All the scar tissue in itself is a bit of a bacteria breeding ground. A bit of a foul odor isn't enough to be concerned, however, if you ran a fever or the area became red or painful, it could be an infection even this long after surgery. I was unfortunate enough to get an infection long after I thought I was out of the woods for one.

      But all in all I think my skin folds funny there, sweats funny there, smells funny there, and just overall has never been the same.

  3. QUESTION:
    How bad does a c-section scar hurt?
    I mean when you think about it, god it's a pretty ghastly injury. I wish they did it to chicks less often.

    • ANSWER:
      The scar itself will not hurt. The procedure will be painful, yes, and the incision will take some days to heal. However, will proper cleaning and perhaps pain medication, the pain will not be excruciating.


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